There’s a lot of unknown, out there…

“Last year, Randa created a division devoted to honing its digital offerings, optimize data collection for its direct-to-consumer operations, as well as to assist retail and brand partners.

Randa Digital Labs is responsible for, among other projects, online content for each of its products, provided to retailer partners free-of-charge, establishing a basic standard for content when an online retailer sells a Randa-made product.

“If someone is putting Levi’s belts as a third-party seller and taking horrible photography, RDL assures that adjacent pages are populated with wonderful storytelling and great photography,” David J. Katz, Randa CMO said.

If Randa’s recent bid for Perry Ellis is any indication, the company is aiming to write the rules itself and remain on the prowl for M&A targets that could further elevate its enterprise to beyond just manufacturing.

“There’s an awful lot of unknown out there,” Katz said. “What’s not healthy is trying to hold onto an old model.”

– Excerpt from Business of Fashion

Faded Department Store Brands Search For New Identity Online

“Brands and the licensees that make their clothes are rewriting the rules of retail as they work together to court the modern consumer and compete online.” BY CATHALEEN CHEN,  AUGUST, 2018

What I learned from playing a doctor on TV

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Zach Braff as JD Dorian, “Scrubs” — © ABC/Disney

I’m not a doctor, but I really did play one on TV.

25 years ago, I sold consumer products, mostly luggage, to HSN and QVC. I hired a “guest host” to appear on-air, to work with the network “show host” and to demonstrate our products. One day the guest host was delayed, and I ended up with make-up on my face, a microphone up my shirt and an IFB in my ear. Continue reading “What I learned from playing a doctor on TV”

For legacy companies facing disruption, corporate innovation won’t be enough

Today corporate innovation is all the rage. Large companies host accelerators, launch internal startups, and court potential startup partners in a quest to harness young companies’ innovativeness and energy for themselves.

But large legacy companies shouldn’t throw the baby out with the bathwater by neglecting their core business and assuming it has minimal room to grow.

In this article, I will detail how our company, Randa Accessories, grew from 25 to 50 percent market share in several categories and channels by focusing on its core business and adjacent “bridge” categories, and offer some takeaways for other businesses based on that experience. (I will also describe how Randa launched its own successful internal startups — I’m not saying corporate innovation isn’t useful, just that it needs to be one part of a broader strategy to excel.)

First, a little about Randa. You many not know our name, but you know our products. Our products are available under 50 brands, and are sold at over 20,000 points of sale, and millions of digital touch points.

We’re the world’s largest men’s accessories company. We sell ties, and belts, wallets, bags, hats, slippers and luggage.

Randa is completely vertical, business-to-business and direct-to-consumer, with 4,000 employees working from 23 global offices.

Our culture emphasized growth and efficiency and led us to success in revenue, margin, penetration, and market share.

For example, we’re the leading supplier of belts to Nordstrom… and to Walmart, to Kohl’s and to Amazon, and The Hudson’s Bay, Liverpool, Printemps, El Cortes Ingles, David Jones, John Lewis and to Costco.

We spent over $50 million to assure that when a consumer walks into a retail store for pants, they immediately see our belts nearby. Dress shirts? There are our ties…

And then, we hit a wall. 

Continue reading “For legacy companies facing disruption, corporate innovation won’t be enough”

The End of Mass Marketing: Go Small, or Go Home

Once upon a time… business success was based on providing a narrow segment of consumers with a narrow segment of products, uniquely suited to their needs, sourced and advertised locally, and sold at a local store.

Over time, the spread of mass media — TV, national newspapers and magazines — along with the expansion of national retail stores, and the growth of a global and highly efficient supply chain, led to a world of mass marketing, mass production, and massive retailers. The retail world moved from personalized products for localized, niche markets to mass-produced products for mass markets.

Mass marketers thrive on “must-have” items — huge volumes of single styles, sold across many market segments to an audience of consumers eager to have the item they saw advertised in mass media, and which, in turn are produced in great scale and efficiency.

This strategy worked. Until it didn’t.

Continue reading “The End of Mass Marketing: Go Small, or Go Home”

Hot off the presses

Monday’s edition of the New York Post became a must-have accessory this morning due to its full front- and back-page ads touting the cult skateboarding brand “Supreme.”

Newsstands were reportedly sold-out before the sun came up.

Monday morning, Supreme posted an Instagram video of its NY Post collector’s edition rolling off the presses in The Bronx — and customers began buying and selling the limited edition copies. (Aren’t all newspaper issues limited editions?)

While “The Post” generally sells for $1 an issue, some people were already re-selling single copies for up to $100. ($100 for copies of the printed ad?) Expect to see this issue selling on eBay shortly for even more…

Supreme is an American skateboarding shop and clothing brand established in New York City in April 1994. The brand caters to youth culture, in particular the skateboarding, hip hop, and rock cultures. The brand’s clothes, accessories and skateboards are sold extensively in secondary markets.

(c) David J. Katz, 2018

Where Will Tomorrow’s Retail Leaders Come From?

Look at Kohl’s.

  • Prior to joining Kohl’s, new CEO Michelle Gass, spent 17 years at Starbucks and began her career with Proctor & Gamble.

  • Kohl’s recently appointed president, Sona Chawla, spent 7 years at Walgreens as president of ecommerce.

  • Chief Merchanding Officer, Doug Howe joined the company from QVC.

  • And Chief Marketing Officer, Gregg Revelle, served at Best Buy, AutoNation & Expedia prior to joining Kohl’s. 

Really? What do they know about general merchandising?

A lot. Kohl’s shares are up an impressive 30% in 2018 – during a “retail apocalypse.”
Kohl’s has shops where customers can return their Amazon purchases, and buy Amazon Echo, Fire & Kindle devices. Crazy? Like a fox. It’s doubtful that Kohl’s is creating new Amazon customers, and the store is generating increased traffic & loyalty.
Want groceries with your comforter set? Aldi will open supermarkets inside Kohl’s doors as part of a new partnership. Strange bedfellows or clever collaboration? Credit Kohl’s with innovation and a focus on fundamental retail metrics – driving increased sales with less inventory – better turn, less dilution.
Well done.
And, the company is well positioned to gain market share from recently departed retailers Bon-Ton, Toys R Us and Babies R Us.

(c) David J. Katz, 2018

Where are Brands Headed in the Amazon Era?

David J. Katz Podcast

An Interview with David J. Katz – eCommerce Braintrust

Today we have a really fascinating and informative interview with David Katz, of Randa Accessories. He shares with us a lot of his knowledge about brands, where they come from and where they are in the Amazon era. As a result of David’s abundant history in direct marketing, he has a really unique perspective on this topic. On the show today he talks about how his direct marketing has evolved and why he believes that brands are becoming more important, even with the seeming migration of consumers away from brands and towards private labels.

David is the alchemist and Chief Marketing Officer at Randa Accessories, a leading multinational consumer products company and also the largest men’s accessories business worldwide. He is also the co-author of the bestselling book Design for Response- Creative Direct Marketing That Works a frequent public speaker referred to by the press as a retail industry expert.

As a company, Randa is still very involved with the Amazon ecosystem. As  both a seller and a vendor on Amazon, the company continues to have a robust partnership with Amazon, despite the fact that Amazon is moving powerfully forward into private label brands in the accessory space. Tune in to find out what David has to share about brands and where they fit in today’s consumer ecosystem.

  • Kiri Masters

Continue reading “Where are Brands Headed in the Amazon Era?”

New Brand, Old Brand, Private Brand, National Brand

 

This week Target Department Stores added two private brands, and exited one exclusive national brand.

On August 3rd, 2018, Target launched “Wild Fable” and “Original Use,” while announcing that the company will be ending its fourteen year deal with Hanesbrands, Inc. for Champion “C9” at the end of next year. 

Continue reading “New Brand, Old Brand, Private Brand, National Brand”

Ralph Lauren & Central Park: A 50 Year Love Affair

Ralph Lauren will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of his company at Bethesda Terrace in Central Park during New York Fashion Week.

The fashion show and dinner, scheduled for September 7, will benefit the Central Park Conservancy, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring and maintaining the beloved New York City park.

Continue reading “Ralph Lauren & Central Park: A 50 Year Love Affair”