Everything That Can Be Invented Has Been Invented

In 1889, Charles H. Duell was the Commissioner of US patent office. He is widely quoted as having stated that the patent office would soon shrink in size, and eventually close, because…

“Everything that can be invented has been invented.”

Charles H. Duell*, 1899

The “Eureka” effect is based upon an ancient myth regarding the Greek mathematician Archimedes, who upon discovering how to measure the volume of an irregular object, supposedly leaped out of a public bath, and ran home naked shouting “eureka,” (I found it).

Most of us would agree that there is still much to be invented and discovered. We tend to think these new “inventions” will be more extraordinary, advanced and innovative than those which preceded them. This is not entirely true. Many prior advances were revolutionary and extraordinary. An invention need not be revolutionary, or even unique, to be significant. Finally, many “new” inventions are derivative of their predecessors.

From door locks to light bulbs, shovels to toilets, and the classic mouse-trap, innovation comes in many forms and from many directions, often right under our noses. Sliced bread? Bottled water?

Nothing is so basic, or so great, that it cannot be made better. Continue reading “Everything That Can Be Invented Has Been Invented”

Vegan Stan Smiths, a Birthday Present for Stella McCartney.

The British designer, a champion for cruelty-free fashion, has used “vegan” animal-free leather to create a sustainable take on the iconic adidas tennis shoe.

“Many years ago, I was given a special pair of vegetarian leather Stan Smiths by my husband and Adidas,” she told Vogue Magazine. “It occurred to me that you really couldn’t tell the difference between the real leather and the faux leather pair. I could not help but think of how many animals’ lives could be saved if Stan Smith and Adidas would change from real leather to vegetarian leather, and use non-animal-based glues.”

The “Stella Stan Smith” looks nearly identical to the classic, except for a few details: Instead of a Kelly-green heel, the shoes feature a burgundy and navy color-block stamped with McCartney’s logo. The stripes down the side are replaced with tiny punched-out stars, a McCartney motif, and while Stan Smith’s profile remains on the right tongue, the left one features Ms. McCartney.

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The shoes are available for sale, today, in time for Stella McCartney’s birthday, and fashion week – they retail for $325.

 

 

New York Fetes Ralph Lauren During Fashion Week. And Vice Versa.

Happy 50th anniversary Ralph Lauren.

The weather, although warm, was pleasant. A good thing, as the celebration during New York Fashion Week (NYFW) was held in Central Park at Bethesda Terrace.

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The guest list included fashion icons Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Anna Wintour (of course); also, Steven Spielberg, Kanye West, Chance the Rapper, Anne Hathaway, and Jessica Chastain.

Hillary Clinton, who often wears Lauren’s clothing, was present. Yet it was Oprah Winfrey who was most quotable. ”Your story exalts our collective story,” Oprah said. “Your designs define integrity.”

It was Oprah who toasted Lauren.

“The real reason we are here is not the show,” she said. “It’s you. You Ralph Lauren, and 50 years of your designing our dreams. When I first moved to Chicago and was making enough money to pay my rent… and still had something left over, I thought I was a success. My idea of celebrating that success wasn’t to go out and get a fancy car, or art or jewelry… it, was a Ralph Lauren bath towel that I had [craved] for over 10 years.”

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Designer Ralph Lauren holds a child model after his 50th anniversary fashion event during New York Fashion Week in New York

Investing in Retail Stores

What apocalypse?

The Tiffany & Co. building on 5th Avenue & 57th Street in New York City may be the most enduring example of what traditional retailing looked like before the Internet arrived. So it’s striking that the Tiffany & Co. of 2018, faced with an onslaught of online ecommerce, is responding by making a big new bet on that big old store. It’s investing $250 million in the 78-year-old flagship.

It turns out that all over the disrupted and evolving retail sector, companies are rethinking the mantra that the future is digital, and are pouring money into actual brick-and-mortar stores. 

Three blocks west of Tiffany’s flagship store is the new 47,000 sq. ft. Nordstrom‘s Men’s Store with a full store opening next door. And, Target has committed $7 billion to upgrade operations, and while the Minneapolis retailer hasn’t disclosed how much of that will go to improving physical locations, a spokeswoman said stores are an “incredibly important linchpin.”

Why? Because the bulk of America’s retail is still done the old-fashioned way, in stores…

{An “Apocalypse” is an event involving destruction on a catastrophic scale. Whereas “evolution” is the development of something, especially from a simple to a more complex form.}