Immersive Retail Experience, Fully Caffeinated

The Starbucks Reserve Roastery opened its doors today in New York City. A further example of mortar & brick retail expansion.

The 23,000 sq. ft. flagship showcases coffee’s journey from bean to cup and joins locations in Seattle, Shanghai & Milan, with future openings coming to Tokyo & Chicago.

The store is a fully working coffee roastery, where small-batch and rare single-origin coffees and blends are created. “We designed the Roastery as the pinnacle experience around all-things-coffee, there is nothing else like it in the world…

It serves as a Starbucks brand amplifier and a platform for future innovation,” said Kevin Johnson, Starbuck’s new ceo.

The Roastery will debut the Arriviamo (aperitivo) Bar, where mixologists will serve cocktails and “spiritfrees” featuring coffee and tea, Drinks will include the Nocino Notte, made with cold brew coffee, barrel-aged gin and black truffle salt, and the Triomphe, made with Teavana Darjeeling Tea, gin, dry Riesling, aquavit, passionfruit sparkling water & orange saffron bitters.

Customers will also discover the Milanese bakery Princi with on-site baking of fresh breads, Pizzas, cornetti, focaccias, desserts and more.

Hot off the presses

Monday’s edition of the New York Post became a must-have accessory this morning due to its full front- and back-page ads touting the cult skateboarding brand “Supreme.”

Newsstands were reportedly sold-out before the sun came up.

Monday morning, Supreme posted an Instagram video of its NY Post collector’s edition rolling off the presses in The Bronx — and customers began buying and selling the limited edition copies. (Aren’t all newspaper issues limited editions?)

While “The Post” generally sells for $1 an issue, some people were already re-selling single copies for up to $100. ($100 for copies of the printed ad?) Expect to see this issue selling on eBay shortly for even more…

Supreme is an American skateboarding shop and clothing brand established in New York City in April 1994. The brand caters to youth culture, in particular the skateboarding, hip hop, and rock cultures. The brand’s clothes, accessories and skateboards are sold extensively in secondary markets.

(c) David J. Katz, 2018

Where are Brands Headed in the Amazon Era?

David J. Katz Podcast

An Interview with David J. Katz – eCommerce Braintrust

Today we have a really fascinating and informative interview with David Katz, of Randa Accessories. He shares with us a lot of his knowledge about brands, where they come from and where they are in the Amazon era. As a result of David’s abundant history in direct marketing, he has a really unique perspective on this topic. On the show today he talks about how his direct marketing has evolved and why he believes that brands are becoming more important, even with the seeming migration of consumers away from brands and towards private labels.

David is the alchemist and Chief Marketing Officer at Randa Accessories, a leading multinational consumer products company and also the largest men’s accessories business worldwide. He is also the co-author of the bestselling book Design for Response- Creative Direct Marketing That Works a frequent public speaker referred to by the press as a retail industry expert.

As a company, Randa is still very involved with the Amazon ecosystem. As  both a seller and a vendor on Amazon, the company continues to have a robust partnership with Amazon, despite the fact that Amazon is moving powerfully forward into private label brands in the accessory space. Tune in to find out what David has to share about brands and where they fit in today’s consumer ecosystem.

  • Kiri Masters

Continue reading “Where are Brands Headed in the Amazon Era?”

New Brand, Old Brand, Private Brand, National Brand

 

This week Target Department Stores added two private brands, and exited one exclusive national brand.

On August 3rd, 2018, Target launched “Wild Fable” and “Original Use,” while announcing that the company will be ending its fourteen year deal with Hanesbrands, Inc. for Champion “C9” at the end of next year. 

Continue reading “New Brand, Old Brand, Private Brand, National Brand”

Ralph Lauren & Central Park: A 50 Year Love Affair

Ralph Lauren will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of his company at Bethesda Terrace in Central Park during New York Fashion Week.

The fashion show and dinner, scheduled for September 7, will benefit the Central Park Conservancy, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring and maintaining the beloved New York City park.

Continue reading “Ralph Lauren & Central Park: A 50 Year Love Affair”

Annual Retail Forum: “Retail Radicals”

Very honored to speak at the “Annual Retail Forum” at Columbia Business School, Wednesday, August 1st.

Joining “Retail Radicals” including Mickey Drexler, Jill Granoff, Paul Charron, Richard Jaffe, Robin Lewis, Mark Bozek, Alex Brick , Mark A. Cohen, Anne Marie Stephen, and other leaders and luminaries for a one-day interactive summit on emerging brands and macro shifts shaping the future of the retail industry.

This program showcases retail radicalism from a multi-disciplinary perspective, identifying the skills, knowledge base, and best practices required to lead the retail industry into the future…

Date: Wednesday, August 1, 2018
Venue: Uris Hall, Room 301, Columbia University Campus
Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Private “Label” vs. Private “Brands”

Let’s be careful not to confuse private “labels” with private “brands.”

Private label merchandise is generic goods, sold as a commodity (and commodities have price as their value proposition). Private brands, when properly executed, are truly brands, exclusive to a retailer or channel of distribution, with distinct brand attributes, supported by significant marketing. 

Overall, private “label” continues the “race to the bottom,” favoring low cost producers. The problem with the race to the bottom is that you might just win — or worse, come in second. 

Continue reading “Private “Label” vs. Private “Brands””

Ralph Lauren Charts a New Course

It’s been tough road for Ralph Lauren as the company approaches it’s 50th year.
Revenue has fallen, the company is closing it’s iconic Fifth Avenue flagship store, and it’s legacy strategy and products are struggling to find a new path in the changing retail landscape.
However, a revitalized management team, led by new CEO Patrice Louvet, appears to be navigating a course toward success.
Last week, Ralph Lauren reported results that beat analysts’ expectations. On a global basis, margins improved, promotions and inventory decreased. (Although North American sales for Q4 were down, Asia and EU were up).
The stock popped +14%.
Mr. Louvet has a refreshing focus on consumer insights and path-to-purchase, a “listen more and speak less” approach. I’m a fan of Mr. Louvet, the refreshed RL management team, the brand(s) and the company, and… of discovering and delivering on the consumer’s “job to be done.”
Fingers crossed…