Authenticity is Overrated

Miquela Sousa, who recently graced billboards from London to Japan as part of an UGG ad campaign, ticks off all the boxes for a fashion model of the moment: She is exotic, attractive and huge on Instagram.

She is also entirely fake news, a computer-generated character who—despite her Instagram posts—can’t feel the pain of a hangover or appreciate how hard it is to walk in stilettos.

Miquela was created by LA startup, Brud, which is betting that it can turn her, and other CGI social-media personalities, into a cast of characters that is one part Marvel Entertainment and one part Kardashian.

Like comic-book characters or even Barbie, they can evolve with the times without aging. And, unlike real-life characters, their drama can be managed. Brud launched Miquela on Instagram in 2016. With carefully composed images, she appeared lifelike and didn’t identify herself as CGI until recently, as part of a staged drama that played out over a series of posts. On Instagram, she (it?) professed to be angry at Brud for lying to her about her true origin. Yoree Koh & Georgia WellsThe Wall Street Journalh

Hot off the presses

Monday’s edition of the New York Post became a must-have accessory this morning due to its full front- and back-page ads touting the cult skateboarding brand “Supreme.”

Newsstands were reportedly sold-out before the sun came up.

Monday morning, Supreme posted an Instagram video of its NY Post collector’s edition rolling off the presses in The Bronx — and customers began buying and selling the limited edition copies. (Aren’t all newspaper issues limited editions?)

While “The Post” generally sells for $1 an issue, some people were already re-selling single copies for up to $100. ($100 for copies of the printed ad?) Expect to see this issue selling on eBay shortly for even more…

Supreme is an American skateboarding shop and clothing brand established in New York City in April 1994. The brand caters to youth culture, in particular the skateboarding, hip hop, and rock cultures. The brand’s clothes, accessories and skateboards are sold extensively in secondary markets.

(c) David J. Katz, 2018