Immersive Retail Experience, Fully Caffeinated

The Starbucks Reserve Roastery opened its doors today in New York City. A further example of mortar & brick retail expansion.

The 23,000 sq. ft. flagship showcases coffee’s journey from bean to cup and joins locations in Seattle, Shanghai & Milan, with future openings coming to Tokyo & Chicago.

The store is a fully working coffee roastery, where small-batch and rare single-origin coffees and blends are created. “We designed the Roastery as the pinnacle experience around all-things-coffee, there is nothing else like it in the world…

It serves as a Starbucks brand amplifier and a platform for future innovation,” said Kevin Johnson, Starbuck’s new ceo.

The Roastery will debut the Arriviamo (aperitivo) Bar, where mixologists will serve cocktails and “spiritfrees” featuring coffee and tea, Drinks will include the Nocino Notte, made with cold brew coffee, barrel-aged gin and black truffle salt, and the Triomphe, made with Teavana Darjeeling Tea, gin, dry Riesling, aquavit, passionfruit sparkling water & orange saffron bitters.

Customers will also discover the Milanese bakery Princi with on-site baking of fresh breads, Pizzas, cornetti, focaccias, desserts and more.

UNTUCKit Valued at $600 Million

UNTUCKit, the company known for its untucked shirts, is looking to raise money at a valuation greater than $600 million.

As reported by Lauren Thomas for CNBC, the “digital first” company, launched in 2011, now has roughly $150 million in sales, 50 stores and is profitable.

Untuckit has hired investment bank Morgan Stanley to raise money to fuel growth

UNTUCKit now offers women’s dresses, T-shirts, jackets and shirts, in addition to boys’ shirts and bottoms.

Congratulations to co-founders Aaron Sanandres and Chris Riccobono.

Notably, several companies including J.Crew, Proper Cloth and Gap Inc. also produce shirts in an “untucked” fit.

Investing in Retail Stores

What apocalypse?

The Tiffany & Co. building on 5th Avenue & 57th Street in New York City may be the most enduring example of what traditional retailing looked like before the Internet arrived. So it’s striking that the Tiffany & Co. of 2018, faced with an onslaught of online ecommerce, is responding by making a big new bet on that big old store. It’s investing $250 million in the 78-year-old flagship.

It turns out that all over the disrupted and evolving retail sector, companies are rethinking the mantra that the future is digital, and are pouring money into actual brick-and-mortar stores. 

Three blocks west of Tiffany’s flagship store is the new 47,000 sq. ft. Nordstrom‘s Men’s Store with a full store opening next door. And, Target has committed $7 billion to upgrade operations, and while the Minneapolis retailer hasn’t disclosed how much of that will go to improving physical locations, a spokeswoman said stores are an “incredibly important linchpin.”

Why? Because the bulk of America’s retail is still done the old-fashioned way, in stores…

{An “Apocalypse” is an event involving destruction on a catastrophic scale. Whereas “evolution” is the development of something, especially from a simple to a more complex form.}